Friday, January 29, 2010

Robust Woodpecker Feeding Its Young

Originally posted 12/28/11 - backdated to organize posts by topic. 


This video of a female Robust Woodpecker, Pica-pau-rei, feeding its nestling is remarkable for its quality. You can adjust settings at your end to watch the video in 720p HD. It's interesting to see how it takes a while for the adult bird to transfer the beetle grub to the young bird. This is one of many excellent videos and photos that can be found at Fotografias da Natureza, a site by Jorge Kutsmi where he shares beautiful imagery that he has captured in the Atlantic Forest in Brazil. 

Below is an introduction from Jorge Kutsmi's site (translated into English using Google) along with a link to his site.


Birds of the Atlantic Forest
Most people do not have the opportunity to be in touch with nature and see that there are still gems to survive despite the ravages and neglect by which, directly or indirectly we are all responsible. This reality, the idea of ​​recording a short drive by the Atlantic Forest, to observe their birds, captured by the lens of a camera. Admire them here while they live there in the forest free, perpetual colors, sounds and movements: the nobility of photography!

And here is the intriguing story of this video:

Martjan Lammertink said...
A remarkable thing about this video is that the cavity seems extremely shallow and that the chick seems to be sitting horizontally on the bottom while it is being fed. Typically, Campephilus nest holes (and those of most other woodpeckers) are quite deep. When the chicks are near fledging, they receive food in the nest entrance but in a different posture than what is seen in the video. I e-mailed the film maker Jorge Kutsmi to ask if there was a special circumstance that made the chick end up in this odd, apparent emergency situation of a cavity, and indeed Jorge wrote back to me with the following:

“The explanation I got was that the nest was originally in the same tree (an embaúba tree in an advanced stage of decay). A rain storm with strong gusts of wind broke the tree exactly where the original nest cavity was. The person who took care of the land found the broken tree and two young woodpeckers, one dead and another alive and all wet. Because the parents were around he put the chick in another cavity in the part of the same tree that was still standing and they started to feed him. It is even possible the hole in the video was made by the person who rescued the chick, I never met him and did not hear more details of the event”.
 

1 comments:

Martjan Lammertink said...

A remarkable thing about this video is that the cavity seems extremely shallow and that the chick seems to be sitting horizontally on the bottom while it being fed. Typically, Campephilus nest holes (and those of most other woodpeckers) are quite deep. When the chicks are near fledging, they receive food in the nest entrance but in a different posture than what is seen in the video. I e-mailed the film maker Jorge Kutsmi to ask if there was a special circumstance that made the chick end up in this odd, apparent emergency situation of a cavity, and indeed Jorge wrote back to me with the following:

“The explanation I got was that the nest was originally in the same tree (an embaúba tree in an advanced stage of decay). A rain storm with strong gusts of wind broke the tree exactly where the original nest cavity was. The person who took care of the land found the broken tree and two young woodpeckers, one dead and another alive and all wet. Because the parents were around he put the chick in another cavity in the part of the same tree that was still standing and they started to feed him. It is even possible the hole in the video was made by the person who rescued the chick, I never met him and did not hear more details of the event”.

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